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Do Computer Blue Light Glasses Work?

It seems like everyone is talking about computer glasses these days – and with good reason! Whether it’s our computers, phones, or tablets, we are spending more time than ever looking at screens. Computer glasses are designed to protect your eyes from the harmful blue light emitted by digital screens. But do they actually work?

 

The short answer is yes. Computer blue light glasses help reduce your exposure to harmful blue light. But there’s a bit more to it than that. Let’s take a closer look at how computer glasses work and what you need to know to ensure they’re effective.

 

What are blue light computer glasses?


Reduced Digital Eye Strain (DES) is the primary goal of computer glasses. These glasses have coatings that help to lessen DES, such as an anti-glare coating or blue light filter, a slight magnification, and a decentered pupillary distance. An anti-glare or anti-reflective coating is necessary to reduce reflections from overhead fluorescent lights and computer screens on the front of the lens surface. A blue light filter will block out the blue light emitted from devices. Generally speaking, the magnifying power of computer glasses is roughly 60% of that of reading glasses. The ideal magnification, however, differs from person to person. It depends on how far away from a computer or other digital gadget you choose to sit.

 

The average person spends over seven hours a day staring at screens, whether it’s a computer, phone, or TV. And all that blue light exposure can be really tough on your eyes. That’s where blue light glasses and computer glasses come in.

 

So, what’s the difference between the two? Blue light glasses are designed to filter out harmful blue-violet light waves that can cause digital eye strain, while computer glasses are specifically tailored to help you see the screen more clearly.

 

If you’re looking for a pair of glasses to help reduce your screen time, we recommend checking out our selection of blue light-blocking glasses. And if you need a little extra help seeing the screen, our computer glasses will do the trick.

 

Do blue light glasses help with computer vision syndrome?

As we continue to spend more time looking at screens, it’s essential to be aware of the potential problems that can arise from too much screen time. One of those problems is called computer vision syndrome (CVS).

 

CVS is a collection of symptoms that can include the following:

Dry eyes

Eye fatigue

Watery eyes

– Burning sensation

Blurry vision

– Pain in the back, neck, and shoulders

Headache

– Difficulty concentrating



According to research, wearing blue light glasses can help reduce these symptoms by blocking out some of the harmful blue light. This can help reduce eye strain and other CVS symptoms. If you spend a lot of time looking at screens, make sure to take breaks often. Use the 20/20/20 rule, every 20 minutes look 20 meters away for 20 seconds, this helps the eye muscles to relax. Remember to blink often to keep your eyes lubricated.

Conclusion

Now that you know the importance of using computer blue light glasses, you should check out our range on our website and start looking after your eyes. By doing this, you can help protect your vision and ensure that you can keep using your computer often without any problems. Trust us – your eyes will thank you for it!

Ask the Optician

ASK NOW

Do Computer Blue Light Glasses Work?

It seems like everyone is talking about computer glasses these days – and with good reason! Whether it’s our computers, phones, or tablets, we are spending more time than ever looking at screens. Computer glasses are designed to protect your eyes from the harmful blue light emitted by digital screens. But do they actually work?

 

The short answer is yes. Computer blue light glasses help reduce your exposure to harmful blue light. But there’s a bit more to it than that. Let’s take a closer look at how computer glasses work and what you need to know to ensure they’re effective.

 

What are blue light computer glasses?


Reduced Digital Eye Strain (DES) is the primary goal of computer glasses. These glasses have coatings that help to lessen DES, such as an anti-glare coating or blue light filter, a slight magnification, and a decentered pupillary distance. An anti-glare or anti-reflective coating is necessary to reduce reflections from overhead fluorescent lights and computer screens on the front of the lens surface. A blue light filter will block out the blue light emitted from devices. Generally speaking, the magnifying power of computer glasses is roughly 60% of that of reading glasses. The ideal magnification, however, differs from person to person. It depends on how far away from a computer or other digital gadget you choose to sit.

 

The average person spends over seven hours a day staring at screens, whether it’s a computer, phone, or TV. And all that blue light exposure can be really tough on your eyes. That’s where blue light glasses and computer glasses come in.

 

So, what’s the difference between the two? Blue light glasses are designed to filter out harmful blue-violet light waves that can cause digital eye strain, while computer glasses are specifically tailored to help you see the screen more clearly.

 

If you’re looking for a pair of glasses to help reduce your screen time, we recommend checking out our selection of blue light-blocking glasses. And if you need a little extra help seeing the screen, our computer glasses will do the trick.

 

Do blue light glasses help with computer vision syndrome?

As we continue to spend more time looking at screens, it’s essential to be aware of the potential problems that can arise from too much screen time. One of those problems is called computer vision syndrome (CVS).

 

CVS is a collection of symptoms that can include the following:

Dry eyes

Eye fatigue

Watery eyes

– Burning sensation

Blurry vision

– Pain in the back, neck, and shoulders

Headache

– Difficulty concentrating



According to research, wearing blue light glasses can help reduce these symptoms by blocking out some of the harmful blue light. This can help reduce eye strain and other CVS symptoms. If you spend a lot of time looking at screens, make sure to take breaks often. Use the 20/20/20 rule, every 20 minutes look 20 meters away for 20 seconds, this helps the eye muscles to relax. Remember to blink often to keep your eyes lubricated.

Conclusion

Now that you know the importance of using computer blue light glasses, you should check out our range on our website and start looking after your eyes. By doing this, you can help protect your vision and ensure that you can keep using your computer often without any problems. Trust us – your eyes will thank you for it!

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